Are men or women favored in process serving?

  • If you need something served do you favor a man over a woman or do you not care?

  • As a person answering your door, is one more or less threatening to you as a stranger?

  • In today’s “woke” world is there a bias, consciously or subconsciously?


The Background

Process serving is hard work for both men and women and the topics of gender equality don’t make the work any easier (or any harder). In the EZ Knock Marketplace there are roughly 40% female process servers, this compares to 51% in the general population nationwide. Arguably, in recent years more and more women are finding their way in process serving.

So, is one gender or another better at serving process? Better or worse is difficult to quantify in process serving and the data in the field is somewhat limited; however, based on data available to EZ Knock Marketplace the answer seems to be that gender, or perceived gender, doesn’t affect outcomes in a statistically relevant way.


The Stats

  • Successful Service – men and women get roughly the same results when measured in total. This isn’t to say that on certain serves one isn’t better or worse than the other, but as a whole there is no statistical difference in successful service. In other words, when provided a good address to serve and a reasonably willing recipient a process server will prevail, regardless of he vs she.

  • Attempts Per Success – an often overlooked fact is that process servers frequently make multiple attempts to complete service. In this statistic there is no difference to support women or men making fewer attempts or more attempts, again they rank similarly to all process servers.

  • Non Service – the dreaded outcome where successful service isn’t made. Could be from an evader, a bad address or other contributors the process server just can’t get them all. So, on these do women or men make more attempts to get the same result. Nope…..once again the data points to relative equality.

In our sample set of roughly 100,000 serves the only deviation pertaining to gender was that female process servers, as a group, appear to be more likely to do process serving as a side job or add on whereas men appear to be more likely to be full time in the field. This information is solely based on the total number of attempts being made by males vs females in the sample set.


The gender battle will rage on and if we drill down to geography, case type, age and other variables there may be advantages to one gender vs another. Let us know in the comments if you feel like your demographic is the best for service of process.

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